School Counseling p k to 12For Testing on or after 9/1/2021

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Competencies and Skills and Blueprint

The test design below describes general testing information. The blueprints that follow provide a detailed outline that explains the competencies and skills that this test measures.

Test Design

table describing the format of the test, including test time, number of questions, and required passing score
Format Computer-based test (CBT)
Number of Questions Approximately 100 multiple-choice questions
Time 2 hours and 30 minutes
Passing Score A scaled score of at least 200

 

Competencies, Skills, and Approximate Percentages of Questions

graph of percentages of each competency's weight toward overall test score, described in table below

table describing the competencies, skills, and approximate percentage of each competency's weight toward overall test score
Competency Approximate Percentage of Total Test Questions
1 Knowledge of counseling 10%
2 Knowledge of programs and interventions for addressing current issues in schools 10%
3 Knowledge of assessment in promoting student success 10%
4 Knowledge of career development and postsecondary opportunities 10%
5 Knowledge of consultation, collaboration, and coordination 10%
6 Knowledge of professional, ethical, and legal considerations 10%
7 Knowledge of student appraisal and advisement 10%
8 Knowledge of the development and assessment of exemplary comprehensive school counseling programs 12%
9 Knowledge of technology and digital citizenship 8%
10 Knowledge of cultural competence for school counselors 10%

Competencies and Skills

Competency 1—Knowledge of counseling
  1. Apply evidence-based counseling theories and techniques in the school setting (e.g., Adlerian, rational emotive behavior, cognitive behavioral, solution focused, person centered, family system, choice).

  2. Analyze the ways in which identity, personality, learning, and human development theories are embedded in counseling theories.

  3. Apply counseling theories and techniques that are evidence-based, relevant, and appropriate to specific situations and populations, including how to modify counseling techniques to meet the needs of diverse groups and populations.

  4. Determine criteria for selecting appropriate modes of counseling interventions in individual, small-group, and classroom settings.

  5. Analyze therapeutic factors, processes, procedures, and stages in counseling groups.

  6. Apply listening, responding, and leadership skills for facilitating small and large groups, including classroom management, with students and other stakeholders.

Competency 2—Knowledge of programs and interventions for addressing current issues in schools
  1. Apply evidence-based strategies that promote academic, career, and social-emotional student competencies.

  2. Apply principles and practices of crisis planning and response (e.g., responses to death, natural disasters, acts of violence, medical emergencies, trauma).

  3. Analyze and apply preventative programs (e.g., drug education, personal safety, bullying) and appropriate interventions to address high-risk student behaviors within a comprehensive school counseling program.

  4. Apply principles and practices of peer helper programs (e.g., peer mediation, peer tutoring, peer mentoring, peer leadership).

  5. Interpret the components and themes that comprise the ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs (e.g., define, manage, deliver, assess, systemic change, collaboration, advocacy, leadership) and how these elements contribute to an effective comprehensive school counseling program.

Competency 3—Knowledge of assessment in promoting student success
  1. Apply basic measurement concepts (e.g., validity, norming, reliability, error of measurement, standardization) in school counseling contexts.

  2. Analyze factors that influence student performance and affect test results and ways to address these factors in a comprehensive school counseling program.

  3. Analyze the major functions, strengths, and limitations of various standardized and nonstandardized assessments.

  4. Apply concepts related to formal and informal assessments and the use of assessment results to promote systemic change and student success.

  5. Apply effective methods for gathering and synthesizing data from a variety of sources (e.g., response to intervention/multi-tiered system of supports, student information system) for a comprehensive assessment of a student and appropriate methods for communicating data to others.

  6. Apply procedures for the ethical and responsible use of formal and informal assessment results from a variety of sources to improve student educational outcomes.

Competency 4—Knowledge of career development and postsecondary opportunities
  1. Analyze principles of prominent career development theories and resources, including assessments, used in career development.

  2. Apply school counseling strategies and activities that address students' college and career readiness across developmental levels, including decision-making approaches for students in various stages of career development.

  3. Apply procedures of formal and informal career assessments and data-driven methods for evaluating students' college and career readiness.

  4. Apply appropriate college and career readiness counseling interventions and schoolwide approaches across levels (e.g., elementary, middle, secondary) that promote lifelong learning and career success.

  5. Compare and contrast resources that provide students with specific information about postsecondary and career and technical educational opportunities and sources of financial assistance.

  6. Apply counseling interventions to address the challenges experienced by diverse populations of students (e.g., first-generation college students, ELLs, students of low socioeconomic status, undocumented students, adjudicated students).

Competency 5—Knowledge of consultation, collaboration, and coordination
  1. Analyze components essential to a school-based consultation model, including consultation strategies appropriate for diverse populations.

  2. Apply strategies, procedures, and processes for collaborating with stakeholders and using data, resources, and technology to create learning environments that promote educational equity, success, and well-being for every student.

  3. Apply appropriate procedures and follow-up strategies for student transitions (e.g., grade level, change of placement, school transfer).

  4. Apply methods for communicating with stakeholders, including teachers, parents or guardians, administrators, district personnel, and community partners, to explain the benefits of a comprehensive school counseling program and share relevant information.

  5. Apply methods for accessing school and community resources to make appropriate in-school and out-of-school referrals.

  6. Apply effective methods and skills (i.e., multicultural, ethical, and professional) for coordinating with stakeholders in the implementation of a comprehensive school counseling program.

Competency 6—Knowledge of professional, ethical, and legal considerations
  1. Analyze the history and foundations of the school counseling profession.

  2. Apply legal standards relevant to the school counseling process and practices.

  3. Apply professional and ethical standards and position statements of the American School Counselor Association.

  4. Interpret the legal rights of students and parents or guardians with regard to student records (e.g., Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, Section 504).

  5. Interpret federal and state legislation concerning students with disabilities, undocumented students, and students who are homeless.

  6. Apply strategies related to the counselor's role as an advocate and leader to promote and support educational equity, inclusiveness, and student success in the school and community.

Competency 7—Knowledge of student appraisal and advisement
  1. Apply effective strategies for promoting awareness of graduation requirements, application and admission processes for various postsecondary options, and financial resources (e.g., FAFSA, Florida Financial Aid Application) for all students and families.

  2. Interpret academic assessment data for appropriate educational placement and progression for all student populations.

  3. Apply principles and practices for assisting all students with curriculum paths to effectively prepare for secondary and postsecondary educational or employment opportunities.

  4. Apply systemic practices that foster equity and access for every student.

Competency 8—Knowledge of the development and assessment of exemplary comprehensive school counseling programs
  1. Apply program assessment methods implemented in a comprehensive school counseling program based on the American School Counselor Association model and the annual administrative conference.

  2. Analyze needs assessment techniques, various types of data (e.g., participation, Mindsets and Behaviors, outcome), and their role in driving program goals and objectives for a comprehensive school counseling program.

  3. Analyze the purposes, types, and basic steps of program assessment and relevant follow-up activities, including the collection and analysis of data related to a comprehensive school counseling program.

  4. Apply strategies for progress monitoring and for sharing program outcomes (e.g., curriculum results, small-group results, closing-the-gap reports) with all stakeholders to effect systemic change.

  5. Apply effective methods for disseminating materials and resources to all stakeholders as part of a comprehensive school counseling curriculum.

  6. Apply practices for identifying and closing achievement, attendance, behavior, resource, opportunity, and informational gaps.

Competency 9—Knowledge of technology and digital citizenship
  1. Apply appropriate use of technology in supporting student learning and development.

  2. Apply appropriate use of technology for managing, storing, and reporting student data.

  3. Apply appropriate use of technology in planning, organizing, delivering, and assessing a comprehensive school counseling program.

  4. Analyze legal, ethical, and cultural considerations of technological applications (e.g., confidentiality, security, privacy, communication practices, use of social media, virtual counseling).

  5. Apply strategies for educating students about appropriate and responsible use of technology and the principles of digital citizenship.

  6. Analyze current trends in technology and the impact on learning and development.

Competency 10—Knowledge of cultural competence for school counselors
  1. Analyze multicultural, pluralistic, and social justice matters when creating school counseling initiatives and developing program goals and objectives.

  2. Analyze the characteristics, needs, and concerns of culturally diverse populations.

  3. Apply methods for developing and delivering culturally responsive curriculum and services for diverse students and families.

  4. Analyze the counselor's ethical responsibility to identify and address their own biases.

  5. Apply multicultural and social justice theories, inclusive strategies, and language that eliminates biases, prejudices, and discriminatory contexts within the school and community.

  6. Apply social justice strategies for advocating against oppressive systemic barriers and leading initiatives to promote a positive and safe school climate for all students.